Isabelle of France: Capetian Sanctity and Franciscan Identity in the Thirteenth/Century

$125.00

Isabelle of France: Capetian Sanctity and Franciscan Identity in the Thirteenth/Century

124 in stock

Description

As the only daughter of Blanche of Castile, one of France s most powerful queens, and as the sister of the Capetian saint Louis IX, Isabelle of France (1225-1270) was situated at the nexus of sanctity and power during a significant era of French culture and medieval history. In this ground-breaking examination of Isabelle s career, Sean Field uses a wealth of previously unstudied material to address significant issues in medieval religious history, including the possibilities for women s religious authority, the creation and impact of royal sanctity, and the relationship between men and women within the mendicant orders.

Field reinterprets Isabelle s career as a Capetian princess. Isabelle was remarkable for choosing a life of holy virginity and for founding and co-authoring a rule for the Franciscan abbey of Longchamp. Isabelle did not become a nun there, but remained a powerful lay patron, living in a modest residence on the abbey grounds. Field maintains that Isabelle was a key